A road trip to a ‘mysterious’ place called Molo in Search of Knowledge!!

How it all started.
When The Technical Centre for Agriculture and Rural cooperation ACP EU (CTA) announced a web 2.0 Learning Opportunity in Molo, Kenya through it’s mailing lists, I was excited and very enthusiastic. I quickly but accurately read through with a focus on the requirements for the training which all seemed perfect for me except one “YOU MUST BE A KENYAN”.  This would have made me give up easily since I am UGANDAN  but being the curious and daring kind of person, this did not deter me from applying for the one week training. I said to myself that I needed the skills just like the Kenyan’s did.

A few weeks Later, I received a call from the Coordinator “ICT and Innovations”, CTA who wanted to know if I really needed the training . My answer was definitely affirmative. I also had an opportunity to ask him why the training was being restricted to Kenyan Citizens yet we call ourselves ‘East Africans’, He told me that CTA did not have enough finances to cater for transport of participants from Outside Kenya but added that a similar training will be conducted early 2011 in Uganda [Not sure about how the political situation will be then]. He added that if I was lucky enough to be shortlisted, I would cater for my own transport to Molo. As I write this blog post, I am seated in a room with 23 Kenyans[Excuse me: Fellow EastAfricans] attending the Web2.0 Learning Opportunity at Baraka Agricultural College in Molo, Kenya.
View Molo on Google Maps

My Journey to Molo.
On the 26th Sept 2010, heeding to a friend’s advice not to board a bus, I headed for the Old Taxi park in Kampala to begin my journey to a mysterious place called MOLO. I was lucky to find the taxi with a small Card board almost half way full having the words TORORO/MALABA inscribed on it. I took up the front seat just next to the driver’s. When it filled up, it was about 9:37am and it took us another 13 minutes to find our way out of the disorganized Taxi park. Once we were out of the park, I estimated 3hours of non-stop driving to reach Malaba boarder. And indeed we were at Malaba at about 1:00pm with delays that  resulted of a few stop overs in Tororo and some time that got wasted when some of the language[also known as “muzigo” in swahilli] fell out of the boot and had to be put back.
At Malaba, the immigration process on the Ugandan side was less of a hustle, I had my passport stamped in  less than 5 mins and straight away headed for  Immigration at the Kenyan side. I nearly shed tears when I saw the long queue. [I later on learnt that the queues were long because the Arrival/Departure forms had gotten finished]. I had to join the queue until I had my passport stamped. I  then rushed to the stage to board the “Eldoret|Nakuru|Nairobi” taxi also known as ‘matatu’ in Kenya. I had to start using Kenya Shillings and start speaking Swahili………………..the money bit was easy but the speech……..

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Conclusion
To cut the long story short, I left malaba after about 2hrs of waiting for the matatu to feel up, reached Eldoret at around 5:47 and left for Nakuru at 7:25. Now MOLO my destination is located between Eldoret and Nakuru but I had to go straight to Nakuru to be on a safer side then board a Matatu on 26th Sept to Molo for the training. I had to speak all the little swahilli I knew because nobody gave a  ‘damn’ about English.  I managed to reach my destination at round 8:00am on the morning of 27th Sept 2010 and was warmly welcomed. I MUST say that despite all the stress and Tension I went through, I am so happy to be at Baraka Agricultural College. It is totally awesome Read more about Baraka 
Please do not ask me how I managed to pay my transport fares!!!
That will be told verbally