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Youth, Skills & Employability at the 6th eLearning Conference in Dar es Salaam.

eLearning Africa is a conference and exhibition organised by ICWE GmbH that focuses on information and communication technologies (ICTs) for development, education and training in Africa. Serving as a pan-African platform, eLearning Africa links a network of decision-makers from governments and administrations with universities, schools, governmental and private training providers, industry and important partners in development cooperation. Each year a different country hosts the event. This year’s conference took place in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from 24th to 28th May 2011 with the theme “Youth, Skills & Employability” and attracted delegates from 90 countries around the world.
This year’s event just like that of 2010 in Zambia was characterized by a photo competition.  The public was called upon  to capture photos on how Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can nurture talent, skills and innovation across Africa. The public was invited to send in photos that depict outstanding achievements in Africa – empowered by ICTs – or that show innovative ways in which ICTs can foster the development of people, communities and society.  With over 120 images submitted, the following winner emerged 
Blogging and Technology camps for Vulnerable groups
I was privileged to chair a session on “How blogging and Technology camps can empower people at risk, women, girls” The session looked at the story of research about the way ICTs influence how girls and boys, women and men relate to each other in African schools. It also examined how blogs, technology camps and literacy programs can improve the livelihood of rural women, support groups at risk and enable the empowerment of girls.  It includes the following presenters:
Oreoluwa Abiodun Somulu from Nigeria: “Building Blocks: The W.TEC Girls Technology Camp”.
Steven Ouma Otieno from Kenya: “Positive Blogging for groups most at risk”.
Judith Sama from cameroon: Urban-Rural Gender Digital Divide in Selected Schools in Central Africa”
John Stephen Olouch from Kenya on the Role of ICT and Literacy in Achieving Sustainable Livelihoods Among Women, Southern Kenya.
African Women and ICT


Talk with Maureen Agena by Batier

For details about the 6th eLearning conference, please visit:

Information Poverty: A barrier to Agricultural Productivity in Rural areas.

The agricultural sector is one of the most under exploited in many African Countries today. In Uganda alone, about 80% of the now approximately 32 million people http://data.worldbank.org/country/uganda  are rural based and depend almost entirely on Agriculture at various Levels of livelihood.
Information poverty is the absolute lack of accurate and timely Agricultural information to effect positive change in this case in the Agriculture Sector. Much as it is believed by many, that access to timely information by rural communities cannot only increase agricultural productivity but enhance social and economic development, many farmers in rural areas lack even the basic access to information.
Can ICTs bridge the Information Poverty gap?
Technologies affects all aspects of life be it social, economic or political. It’s therefore important to understand the role technology can play in Agriculture; to increase productivity, reduce costs as well as increase on the customer base. ICTs have been used as enablers in other sectors like Education, Entrepreneurship, health and sports but their adoption, usage and application in Agriculture is low despite the big role agriculture plays in society.
The inability to access accurate and timely information by rural farmers on climate change, market prices and best practices has negatively affected the final out put in terms of yields and profits. ICTs can play a big role is solving the problem of information poverty among rural farmers. The mobile phone whose penetration into Africa alone is over 500M http://ht.ly/37Ks7 a hand tool that can be used for several purposes because of its ability to combine text, Audio and Video functionality in addition to its ability to cut across literacy levels(Farmers are able to communicate in their local languages). The community radios, Telecenters/Information resource centre and print Media like farmer Magazines are all ICTs that farmers can use to access agricultural information.

MobileActive Video: Mobile phones in rural development & agriculture

Way Forward

Despite a number of challenges faced by the Agricultural sector, there are some things to consider inorder to bridge the Agricultural divide. Some of them are;
·          -Actively involving the Youth in Agricultural initiatives because being the biggest users of ICTs, their potential can be tapped into to divert their skills to Agriculture. They need to start looking at Agriculture as a source of income(Agrobusiness) and not as a dirty job like it has been potryed to them.
·         The agricultural projects must be very Gender sensitive right from the start. In most African Counties, women dominate in agricultural production yet the men do lots of marketing. It’s important to let each Gender play a role right from production to marketing in order to achieve Agricultural food security.
·         Agriculturalists need to work very closely with Journalists. Media plays a very big role in changing the perception people have towards agriculture as a dirty job and a sector of failures. Since journalists set the news agenda, they have to be well informed such that they can document agricultural success stories and stop focusing on only agricultural disasters like famine and floods.
·         Take advantage of New and social media to educate, inform, motivate and involve a number of different stakeholders about the role agriculture can play in economic development of society.

MY FIRST AWARD EVER: EAST AFRICA REGIONAL WINNER.

Having been the very first of its kind; The ARDYIS Youth essay Contest focused on Youth, ICT in Agriculture and Rural Development aimed at identifying innovative solutions to challenges faced by youth in agriculture and rural areas using Information and Communication Technologies.
The essay contest which was open to young people, aged 18 – 25 years old, from urban or rural areas of Africa, Caribbean and the Pacific countries attracted 184 youth applications and only 12 finalists from the six regions were shortlisted. I was among the Young women/professionals who applied and I answered the question on “How young people are using ICTs innovetatively in Agriculture” with a case of a young fruit grower Mr. Gilbert Egwel from Northern Uganda in Apac district.

On 13th October 2010, 12 Finalists with two from each of the six regions of the African, Caribean and Pacific regions (ACP) were announced. After the evaluation of oral presentations of the selected essay took place in South Africa on 22 and 23 November 2010, as part of the CTA/NPCA Week events organized by CTA and the NPCA (NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency) from 22 to 26 November 2010. The 6 winners of the contest were to be announced on 24 November 2010. One winner per ACP region, and an overall winner. However, 7 winners emerged with 2 coming from East Africa as opposed to one. And the winners were:

West Africa:
– Itodo Samuel Anthony (Nigeria)
Central Africa :
– Gabriel Dacko Goudjo (Cameroon)
East Africa
– Maureen Agena (Uganda)
– Chris Ngige Mwangi (Kenya)
Southern Africa
– Gerald Musakaruka Mangena (Zimbabwe)
Caribbean
– Tyrone Christopher Hall (Jamaica)
Pacific
– Riten Gosai Chand (Fiji)
With Caribbean regional winner Tyrone Christopher Hall from Jamaica emerging as the overall Eassy Contest winners.

To all the winners and finalists, WELL DONE and WELL WON and to The centre for Agriculture and Technical rural development(CTA) thanks for looking at the youth as potential players in bridging the Agricultural divide through the use and application of ICTs.

I am a finalist in the ARDYIS Youth Essay Contest: How I made it !!

It was the very first of it’s kind; The ARDYIS Youth essay  Contest which focused on Youth, ICT in Agriculture and Rural Development aimed at identifying innovative solutions to challenges faced by youth in agriculture and rural areas using Information and Communication Technologies.
The essay contest which was open to young people, aged 18 – 25 years old, from urban or rural areas of Africa, Caribbean and the Pacific countries attracted 180 youth applications and only  12 finalists from the six regions were shortlisted. I was among the Young women and professionals who applied and I answered the question on “How young people are using ICTs innovetatively in Agriculture” with a case of a young fruit grower Mr. Gilbert Egwel from Northern Uganda in Apac district.

On 13th October 2010, the Finalists were announced and saying that I was happy would  be an understatement. I must say that I was humbled being among the best in Eastern Africa . The list of the finalists is………….

West Africa:
– Inoussa Traore (Burkina Faso)
– Itodo Samuel Anthony (Nigeria)
Central Africa :
– Dolly Angela Ngandjou Mela (Cameroon)
– Gabriel Dacko Goudjo (Cameroon)
East Africa
– Chris Ngige Mwangi (Kenya)
– Maureen Agena (Uganda)
Southern Africa
– Gerald Musakaruka Mangena (Zimbabwe)
– Isaac Chanda (Zambia)
Caribbean
– Samantha Kaye, Denise Christie (Jamaica)
– Tyrone Christopher Hall (Jamaica)
Pacific
– Riten Gosai Chand (Fiji)
– Ruben Nui (Papua New Guinea)
The jury and organizers warmly congratulated finalists. As specified in the rules of the competition, the
winners will be announced after the evaluation of oral presentations of the short-listed essays by their authors in front of the jury. These oral presentations will take place in South Africa on 22 and 23 November 2010, as part of the CTA/NPCA Week events organized by CTA and the NPCA (NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency) from 22 to 26 November 2010. The 6 winners of the contest will be
announced on 24 November 2010. One winner per ACP region, and an overall winner, will be selected.
The six regional winners will each receive a sum of Euros 1,000 (Regional Prize), along with other rewards. The overall Winner will be selected from the regional Winners and he/she will receive an additional sum of Euros 500 (ACP Prize).
CTA will cover the 12 finalists’ costs for the trip and stay in South Africa. They will take part in one seminar of the CTA/NPCA Week to strengthen their capabilities and interact with other players. CTA and its partners thank and congratulate all participants in the essay contest. Apart from finalists, outstanding participants will have the opportunity, among others, to take part in an Exchange and Training Workshop on Web 2.0 for Development in 2011. The essay contest is one of the activities organized by CTA to commemorate the International Year of Youth established by the United Nations.”

WATER IS EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS. WE ALL NEED IT TO SURVIVE!!

Putting a price on Water will make us aware of its scarcity and make us take better care of it” Agnel Gurria, Secretray –general of the OECD,quoted in The Guardian.’Experts call for hike in global water prices’. April 27th,2010.’”
Water is being referred to as a new oil, says Edith Van Walsum the Director ileai.  The UN declared that access to water and sanitation is a fundamental human right but millions around the world still lack even the most basic access.
With over 88% of Uganda’s population of 32 million being rural based and depending almost entirely on agriculture at various levels of livelihoods. It is widely held that access to clean water for both domestic and agricultural purposes by rural communities can not only increase agricultural productivity; it can also result into improved health which in turn would enhance economic and social development.
Millions of people in Uganda do not have access to clean water for both domestic and agricultural purposes and due to the high costs of conventional piped water, Rain water harvesting, a low cost technique is a valuable alternative to overcome the growing water shortage. People collect and store rain water in buckets, tanks and ponds which they use for multiple purposes ranging from irrigating crops, washing, cooking, bathing and drinking. This collected rain water can supplement other water sources when they become scarce or are of low quality.  
The Technical Center for Agriculture and Rural Cooperations ACP EU(CTA) through her CTA2010annual seminar has dedicated this year’s theme is ‘Closing the Knowledge Gap: Integrated Water Management for Sustainable Agriculture’ to make the world aware of the importance of water  also, this year’s BlogActionDay them is WATER  and all bloggers world over are invited to have their say.

PEOPLE AND THE WEB: Web 2.0 Technologies must be Development Oriented.

As I sat in the room at Baraka Agricultural College to attend the Web 2.0 learning Opportunity in Molo-Kenya, I didn’t know what to expect from the sessions which were yet to start on the morning of 27th Sept 2010. When Mr. Nicholas Kimolo, the key trainer requested us to introduce ourselves and briefly talk about the organizations we work for and what our expectations for the training were? I was second in the queue and stressed the fact that I was from Uganda, I also mentioned that my main expectation is to build on what I already knew about web 2.0 tools. At the end of the introductions, I noticed that I was the only Ugandan in a room of 24 trainees, meaning that 23 were all Kenyans.
Being the only Ugandan trainee didn’t just happen, right from the call for applications, one of the key requirements was to be Kenyan. I was the only lucky non Kenyan shortlisted and eventually invited to attend the one week training. Mr. Nicholas mentioned that over 700 applications had been received but we were the Lucky few to be shortlisted.

The training began with a welcome message from the principle of the hosting college Br. David Muchemi who warmly welcomed the participants to the college. He then gave us a brief background of the college. Read more about Baraka.
Mr. Nicholas Kimolo then introduced his co-facilitator Mr. Morris and gave a brief background of the Web 2.0 learning opportunity. He mentioned that the learning opportunity forms part of CTA initiatives that support development partners in networking, accessing and disseminating information more effectively. He then said that we were being trained as Trainers in the use and application of web 2.0 tools.
The General Principles of Web 2.0 tools
Mr. Kimolo said that the training would entail accessing information using web 2.0, Learn what web 2.0 tools are, what other people have dome with web 2.0,  Breaking it down according to functionality, how web 2.0 have been used to successful disseminate information, remote Collaboration, Voice over Internet protocol (VOIP), Mapping(Information in a Geo form), Blogging, using  Social Networks for Professional Social Networking  and finally introducing the use of iMARK module “web 2.0 and social Media for Development”.
What the participatory web for development is all about.
‘When the web started, we needed a web Master to guide and help end users but today, everything has changed. Web 2.0 tools are 2nd generation tool that empower users on the web to read and write to it. With Web 2.0 tools, you can publish your content without having to rely on others. It is user centered and enables inter-operability and Information sharing.
Web 2.0 tools alone are not relevant unless they are linked to development. They must be Participatory in a sense that people must be involved and sharing/access to information must be voluntary. We need to be ‘people centered’ and understand their needs. We must also understand that access might not only be connection but Language. Web 2.0 tools are of four categories (Aggregation, Collaborative /Filtering, Rating / tagging and Widget/Component).They can either be web based or Non-web-based)
Web 2.0 technologies were made possible because of the falling price of Hardware & Software, the technological Advances (Easy for a non Techie person to communicate and use technology) and the increasing use of Mobile devices especially in Africa.
For the first day of the training, we were introduced to web 2.0 and we looked at the opportunities and threats, we also looked at advanced searches, Alerts and RSS. Today [Day 2], we concentrated on Wikis, GoogleDocs and Skype. 
For the two days that I have so far spent, I must say that a lot of value has been added to what I already knew about web 2.0. I feel that by the end of day 5, I will be a real expert in Web 2.0 applications. Also, the choice of venue for the training was perfect, far from town with no shopping malls to distract participants, therefore the levels of concentration and participation are high.
Thanks to The Technical centre for Agriculture and rural cooperation ACP EU (CTA) for making this possible. I hope that a similar training will be conducted in Uganda in the near future.
At the end of the training, together with three Kenyan colleagues will have an entire write-up about the sessions and I promise to share the link with all you awesome people!!

A road trip to a ‘mysterious’ place called Molo in Search of Knowledge!!

How it all started.
When The Technical Centre for Agriculture and Rural cooperation ACP EU (CTA) announced a web 2.0 Learning Opportunity in Molo, Kenya through it’s mailing lists, I was excited and very enthusiastic. I quickly but accurately read through with a focus on the requirements for the training which all seemed perfect for me except one “YOU MUST BE A KENYAN”.  This would have made me give up easily since I am UGANDAN  but being the curious and daring kind of person, this did not deter me from applying for the one week training. I said to myself that I needed the skills just like the Kenyan’s did.

A few weeks Later, I received a call from the Coordinator “ICT and Innovations”, CTA who wanted to know if I really needed the training . My answer was definitely affirmative. I also had an opportunity to ask him why the training was being restricted to Kenyan Citizens yet we call ourselves ‘East Africans’, He told me that CTA did not have enough finances to cater for transport of participants from Outside Kenya but added that a similar training will be conducted early 2011 in Uganda [Not sure about how the political situation will be then]. He added that if I was lucky enough to be shortlisted, I would cater for my own transport to Molo. As I write this blog post, I am seated in a room with 23 Kenyans[Excuse me: Fellow EastAfricans] attending the Web2.0 Learning Opportunity at Baraka Agricultural College in Molo, Kenya.
View Molo on Google Maps

My Journey to Molo.
On the 26th Sept 2010, heeding to a friend’s advice not to board a bus, I headed for the Old Taxi park in Kampala to begin my journey to a mysterious place called MOLO. I was lucky to find the taxi with a small Card board almost half way full having the words TORORO/MALABA inscribed on it. I took up the front seat just next to the driver’s. When it filled up, it was about 9:37am and it took us another 13 minutes to find our way out of the disorganized Taxi park. Once we were out of the park, I estimated 3hours of non-stop driving to reach Malaba boarder. And indeed we were at Malaba at about 1:00pm with delays that  resulted of a few stop overs in Tororo and some time that got wasted when some of the language[also known as “muzigo” in swahilli] fell out of the boot and had to be put back.
At Malaba, the immigration process on the Ugandan side was less of a hustle, I had my passport stamped in  less than 5 mins and straight away headed for  Immigration at the Kenyan side. I nearly shed tears when I saw the long queue. [I later on learnt that the queues were long because the Arrival/Departure forms had gotten finished]. I had to join the queue until I had my passport stamped. I  then rushed to the stage to board the “Eldoret|Nakuru|Nairobi” taxi also known as ‘matatu’ in Kenya. I had to start using Kenya Shillings and start speaking Swahili………………..the money bit was easy but the speech……..

View Larger Map
Conclusion
To cut the long story short, I left malaba after about 2hrs of waiting for the matatu to feel up, reached Eldoret at around 5:47 and left for Nakuru at 7:25. Now MOLO my destination is located between Eldoret and Nakuru but I had to go straight to Nakuru to be on a safer side then board a Matatu on 26th Sept to Molo for the training. I had to speak all the little swahilli I knew because nobody gave a  ‘damn’ about English.  I managed to reach my destination at round 8:00am on the morning of 27th Sept 2010 and was warmly welcomed. I MUST say that despite all the stress and Tension I went through, I am so happy to be at Baraka Agricultural College. It is totally awesome Read more about Baraka 
Please do not ask me how I managed to pay my transport fares!!!
That will be told verbally

CTA Annual Seminar is on Again.

Uganda Water sector

With the theme: Closing the knowledge Gap: Intergrated Water Management for Sustainable Agriculture. The CTA annual seminar is scheduled to take place in Pretoria, SouthAfrica from 22nd -26th November 2010.
How to be part of the 2010 CTA seminar:
You are invited to send your proposals for seminar papers and poster presentations for the CTA 2010 seminar on ‘Closing the Knowledge Gap: Integrated Water Management for Sustainable Agriculture’. Abstracts are welcome from experts and stakeholders in the following main themes:
  • Water Availability and Access
  • Public Policy and Investment
  • Water and Society
  • Knowledge Support Systems
For more details please visit: CTA2010 Annual Seminnar
The Water Sector in Uganda:
The water sector is one of the priority sectors in Uganda, as it directly impacts on the quality of life of the people and overall productivity of the population. Water supply and sanitation are among the key issues emphasized under the national Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP), which is the key government framework for ensuring poverty eradication through creation of an enabling environment for rapid economic development and social transformation.
Water is a key strategic resource, vital for sustaining life, promoting development and maintaining the environment. Access to clean and safe water and improved sanitation facilities and practices are pre-requisites to a health population and therefore have a direct impact on the quality of life and productivity of the population. Besides domestic water supply, water is also vital for: Livestock Water Supply, Industrial Water Supply, Hydropower generation, Agriculture, Marine Transport, Fisheries, Waste Discharge, Tourism, and Environmental Conservation. Water, therefore, significantly contributes to the national socio-economic development and thus poverty eradication.
Despite Uganda’s being well endowed with significant freshwater resources, the challenges of rapid population growth, increased urbanization and industrialization, uncontrolled environmental degradation and pollution are leading to accelerated depletion and degradation of the available water resources. Uganda is also faced with the challenge of low safe water coverage (59% rural and 65% urban, as of December 2003).
In order to meet the above challenges, government initiated reforms in the water sector, in 1997, to ensure that water services are provided and managed with increased efficiency and cost effectiveness. Comprehensive sector reform studies have been going on since 1998 and are due to be completed by August 2004. During these studies, detailed situation analysis of the sector was carried out resulting in the preparation of a comprehensive water sector Strategy, investment plans and time bound national targets for the sector up to 2015. In demonstrating its commitment to the reform process, government has already embarked on the process of implementing some of the strategic recommendations from these studies.
One of the key strategic outcomes from the reform studies is the adoption of a ‘Sector Wide Approach to Planning (SWAP)’ for the sector. The SWAP framework, which has been embraced by both government and the water sector development partners, has already proved to be themost appropriate mechanism for resources mobilization and implementation of the action plans. The SWAP framework also guarantees the participation of all stakeholders in the planning and implementation of water sector activities.
 (Extracted from Uganda National Water Developmet Report-2005)

Contracted to Tweet and Blog at the 3rd Regional EastAfrica Internet Governace Forum (EAIGF) in Kampala.

The EAIGF twitter page
Globally, technological development has taken the place of face-to-face interaction; with an increasing range of devices for communicating and disseminating information. It is evident that the world is changing rapidly and African Media is catching up with the technological revolution.

At the third East African Internet Governace forum which is being held in Kampala Uganda with a theme:”Strengthening East Africa’s Critical Internet resources: Thinking Globally, Acting Locally”, Twitter an interactive micro blogging platform based on open publication of 140 character messages is one of the most powerful social media tools being used to share information and Network about the event.

A citizen Journalist and a professional Journalist working together.

Together with Ms. Esther Nakazzi a Journalist with the EastAfrican Newspaper, we were contracted as official resource persons in-charge of communication during the 3rd EAIGF. We were tasked with tweeting and blogging during the three days event. I must say that it is very interesting working with a professional Journalist. It is my very first time as a citizen Journalist to be contracted to tweet and blog at a regional workshop. I have always tweeted at workshops, conferences as well as meetings but that was mainly on voluntary basis. These include among others the digital citizen Indaba and Highway Africa 2009 conference in South Africa, the CTA2009Annual Seminar, art and science the international festival TREFFPUNKT AFRIKA among others.

Who inspired me?

Like the saying goes, “Credit must be given where and when it is due”. I first heard about social media and specifically twitter, blogs, facebook, youtube and skype when I Joined Women of Uganda Network as an information Officer in 2008 and was tasked to head the citizen Journalism in Africa Project (CJA) which was funded by Hivos and SANGONeT in SouthAfrica.  Citizen Journalism is a form of citizen media – where individuals write and or comment on issues they feel are left out of the mainstream media using social media and web2.0 tools.

A lot of motivation was from  a freelance Zambian Journalist known as Brenda Zulu who I first met during the 2009 highway African conference and thereafter during the CTA2009 Annual seminar who helped me start up my personal blog http://dignityinpoverty.blogspot.com/ .  

The idea of tweeting during major events is a very powerful one since very many people who would otherwise not have received such information are able to follow and contribute.

Please follow the tweets  https://twitter.com/EA_IGF  and the blog at http://www.eaigf-uganda.blogspot.com/

Maureen Agena: CTA’s FIRST Remote Intern

In 2009, The Technical centre for Agricultural and Rural cooperations  ACP-EU introduced CTA’s Internship and Young professional officers programmes. The Centre offers the beneficiaries of the program the opportunity to acquire practical experience related to their professional backgrounds and aspirations.

How it all began
During CTA’s 2009 annual seminar which was also her 25th anniversary, I was privilledged to meet the biggest percentage of the CTA team in Brussels-Belgium including Mr. Giacomo Rambaldi my current Remote trainer and Mentor. Being a trained Citizen journalist, I did not waste any precious time but decided to join the various web 2.0 platforms that were being used to share information about the seminar and anniversary. Twitter was my favorite platform. I spent most of my time tweeting and re-tweeting until the day I was set to make a presentation on behalf of WOUGNET entitled “Use of web 2.0 tools for sustainable
argriculture: A case of small scale farmers in Uganda”.
The entire idea of web 2.0 tools was “News” to majority of the participants. After the presentation, I had the privilege to share my passion for web 2.0 tools and new media with CTA’s Senior programme Coordinator/ICT and Innovation Mr Giacomo Rambaldi.
After a discussion with WOUGNET coordinator Dr. Dorothy Okello during the CTA observatory Workshop in Netherlads in 2009, it was agreed that I should be recruited as a remote CTA intern.

What the Distance Mentorship Covers.
During the internship period, it is believed that Knowledge and skills will be acquired via remote coaching and hands-on practice. The distance mentorship programme covers the following topics:
Use of SharePoint remote collaboration platform to store and exchange data related to this programme (Microsoft Office environment)
• Use of Joomla (CMS); e.g. publish ready edited content
• Monitor and improve visibility and ranking of websites. This includes SEO assessments, registration on search engines and online directories, planned crawling, establishment of reciprocating links, use of WebRings and other
• Improve dissemination of online products. This involves the posting of short announcements on selected portals, social tagging and tweeting. Content will be provided by CTA.
Moderate and animate the exchanges on the Web2forDev DGroup
• Transcribing and translating videos on dotsub.
My experience.
Being a remote intern had never occurred to me. I did not know that such a “thing” existed, being trained and mentored online using a number of tools. When CTA offered me this opportunity, I was so eager to find out what “remote” internship entailed. I must say that, six months into the internship, I have no regrets at all. The benefits are overwhelming and opportunities keep increasing.
Ø I have understood the power of the internet and the benefits it can offer when properly used.
Ø I have learnt about many more web 2.0 tools and how they work. This has made it possible for me to use the skills for WOUGNET.
Ø Being a trained citizen Journalsit, I am putting into use the practical skills like blogging, tweeting , skyping among others.
Thanks to The Technical centre for Agricultural and Rural cooperations ,CTA’s Internship and Young professional officers programme for giving the youth like me an opportunity to maximize on the potential I have in relation to new and digital Media.

Maureen Agena
Remote Intern
Affiliated to the CTA Distance Mentorship Programme
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Co-operation ACP-EU
P.O. Box 380, NL 6700AJ Wageningen, The Netherlands